E-LEARNING/JOURNALISM NOW

What's coming for journalism in 2018?

As the new year dawns, we ask some of our Journalism Now experts to give us their predictions on what is coming in the next 12 months. Here's what they had to say.

 

 

Chris Birkett, former deputy head of Sky News

"This is the year of AR: Augmented Reality. So many devices are now AR-capable and some great content is being created. I think we’ll see a real boost in AR in 2018."

"The relationship between President Trump and mainstream media is already pretty terrible. But 2018 is a mid-term election year. Can it get any worse? You ain't seen nothing yet!"

 

 

Jamal Osman, Africa reporter, Channel 4 News

"In 2018, we are likely to see a decrease in the number of Africans dying in the Mediterranean Sea while seeking a better life in Europe. Sickening news reports of Africans being sold as slaves in Libya has outraged people in the continent. With very little being done to save the lives of Africans in danger, young Africans may think twice before they attempt the perilous journey. This is good news for Africa, which has lost so many young people in the past decade." 

Jamal's free online course, Building Trust and Reputation, can be found here.

 

 

Deborah Kelly, senior journalist and head of training

"2018 is going to be a great year for audio and podcasts – audio is portable, intimate, great for storytelling and allows you to escape in a way that video never can."

"The challenge for journalists in 2018 will be how to make news work in new story formats. Success will come to those who understand how to create engaging content for the new, but continue to exploit the traditional."

"Local and listening – if we want to engage, journalism must return to its local roots and look to reflect what’s important to the community."

Deborah's online course, Editorial Skills: Engaging & Growing Your Audience, can be found here.

 

Sue Llewellyn, social media expert, former BBC reporter

"Now is the winter of our discontent with social media. Too much noise, negativity and online abuse means we’ll see more people disconnecting from, ‘antisocial media’. The focus should be on quality."

Sue Llewellyn's online courses in social media can be found here.

 

Aidan White, director, Ethical Journalism Network

"2018 will be the year of AI (Artificial Intelligence) and advancements in newsroom technology, but honestly speaking, it's trusted and ethical journalism that still matters most of all."

Aidan's free online course, Ethical Journalist's Toolkit, can be found here.

Live chats: in case you've missed them

Every Friday, our Journalism Now experts go live to talk about what’s new in the industry, what’s making them think and to answer your questions. If you've missed any, you can catch up on all of our live chats on our Facebook page. Here are some of our most popular so far.

#TFJNow

 

Ultimate mojo kit

Our most popular live chat so far, mobile journalism (mojo) expert, Glen Mulcahy, gives us the lowdown on his ultimate and essential mojo kit.

 

Social discovery 

Social media consultant, Sumaiya Omar, has been offering lots of tips about making our content travel as far as possible and using maps for social discovery.

 

Social media trends

The do's and don't's of live streaming from your phone from social media expert, Sue Llewellyn, plus a review of trends in 2017 and predictions for the year ahead.

 

Top 10 mojo rules

For seasoned mobile journalists and newcomers alike, mobile expert, Wytse Vellinga, gives his top 10 things to remember when shooting from your phone.

 

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